Grass & Grain

12-24-2013

Agricultural Newspaper

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Page 30 Grass & Grain, December 24, 2013 Hay baled late needs supplements, but test first Temperatures drop, sunshine dims and pastures stop growing. That's when cow nutrition becomes critical, says Justin Sexten, University of Missouri Extension beef nutritionist. More hay was baled in 2013 than in the drought of 2012. But quantity doesn't equal quality. Much of the hay may not contain enough nutrients. Looking at hay-test reports, Sexten sees that lots of mediocre to bad hay was made this year. Spring rains at haying time delayed baling. Overmature hay has lower feed value. There are options. Stockpiled pasture is first choice for quality winter feed, but that required action in August when cattle were removed from pastures and nitrogen fertilizer applied. Fall growth is left ungrazed until winter. Another feed source is cornfield residue. Ear corn dropped at harvest and leaves and upper stalks provide nutrients for the herd. This may require added supplement for best usage. "In Missouri, cornfields offer our most underused cattle feed," Sexten says. "Grazing stover requires fences and water. But where land was taken out of pasture to plant corn, there may be fences and water available." Using a hot wire to allocate fresh feed every few days improves efficiency. However, Sexten says it's important at this point to just get cattle into the cornfields. Cornstalks deteriorate quickly. "Later, when producers learn the feed value of stover, they'll improve grazing," he says. "For now, try it." With increased use of herbicide-resistant corn, farmers learn the value of cattle picking up dropped corn. Next spring, that seed becomes a volunteer corn plant, a hard-to-kill weed. Worcester tapped as assistant secretary for KDA Acting Secretary of Agriculture Jackie McClaskey has announced Jake Worcester has been hired as an assistant secretary. Worcester, a native of Hill City, has a diverse business background and is a skilled relationship builder with a solid understanding of agriculture. We are excited to have Jake join the Kansas Department of Agriculture team," said McClaskey. "He brings extensive knowledge of agriculture to the agency and is an innovative thinker when it comes to working through challenges. He will be an asset as we work together with our farm and ranch families and agribusiness to grow the state's largest industry," she said. Worcester is a graduate of Kansas State University with a degree in agricultural economics. He was active in student government, serving as KSU student body president. He has close ties to agriculture, having worked on his family farm as a youngster and was an active member of 4-H, FFA and served as a state FFA officer. Most recently he worked as vice president for Peak Solutions USA, a leadership and management consulting firm with specializations in agriculture and manufacturing industries. He also served as the first full-time executive director for the Kansas FFA Foundation and the director of development for the K-State School of Leadership Studies. Worcester and his wife Hilary currently live in Ft. Collins, Colo. and will be moving to Manhattan in the spring. The third feeding option is hay. This year, it may be bad hay. It's not too late to test hay to see how much supplement will be needed to produce the next calf crop. "Test right before feeding time," Sexten says. "Hay tested early can lose quality by feeding time, especially if stored uncovered outdoors." It's nutrients in the feed that count, the nutritionist says. Most often, energy is lacking for cows. But the cow's rumen bugs need protein to digest cellulose in the forage. "Without testing, you'll never know," he says. "Payback comes in not overfeeding or underfeeding on energy or on protein. "To me it is just a math equation. The deciding factor is price per unit of nutrient, not price of the feed." If corn gluten is $205 a ton and dried distillers grain is $225, you'd lose out going for the lower-priced gluten. The distillers grains provide needed en- Nine join KLA'S 50year membership club Nine Kansas Livestock Association (KLA) members were recognized during the KLA Convention December 4 for reaching 50 years of membership. This year's honorees epitomize the diversity and commitment of the organization's membership. Those who joined KLA in 1963 are Les Baumgartner, Sabetha; Don Lundquist, Marquette; Kathryn McLain, Medicine Lodge; Bob Cather, Anthony; Oliver Hess, Alma; Robert (Bob) McClellan, Palco; Elizabeth (Liz) Oswald, Hutchinson; Floyd Larson, Sharon Springs; and Ronald Schultz, Haviland. Attaining 60 years of membership this year are Joe Smith, Tribune; Dor- JC LIVESTOCK SALES INC. 1 4 1 3 9 6 9 5 12 32 5 58 15 121 19 39 42 16 No Sale Dec. 25th & Jan. 1st Due to Holidays! CONSIGNMENTS FOR JANUARY 8: 30 Mix Bred Cows ................8 & Up........................................Calve early spring 54 Ang X Strs/Hfrs................550-700 lbs. ............................................Pre-Vacc. 75 Ang X Strs/Hfrs................650-750 lbs...................................Weaned & Vacc. 54 Ang X Strs/Hfrs................550-700 lbs. ...............................................Weaned 60 Blk X Strs.........................825-875 lbs. .............................................Yearlings 65 Blk X Strs.........................850-875 lbs. .............................................Yearlings 55 Mix Strs............................850-900 lbs. .............................................Yearlings PLUS MORE BY SALE TIME! If you need assistance in marketing your cattle please call & we will be happy to discuss it with you. othy Spade, Reading; 3 Bar Ranch, Coldwater; and Harvey Raaf, Gridley. Darrell Sutor of Zurich was honored for reaching the 70-year mark. "The work KLA does on behalf of its members is made possible by dedicated members such as these who are in it for the long haul," said KLA president Jeff Sternberger, a cattle feeder from Garden City. These honorees bring to 92 the total number of KLA members who have belonged to the organization for 50 years or more. The longest continuously held KLA membership belongs to Jansonius Farms of Prairie View, which joined the association in 1918. CLAY CENTER LIVESTOCK SALES INC. Wednesday Sale, Hogs 10:30 AM • Cattle 12:30 PM For the week of December 18, 2013: STEERS HEIFERS 230 215.00 1 380 182.00 458 211.00 1 405 178.00 525 190.00 5 512 172.00 605 186.00 5 623 159.50 626 184.50 9 670 158.00 631 183.50 9 691 156.25 670 173.50 8 807 151.00 684 172.25 8 904 144.50 708 167.50 2 1025 137.00 774 166.00 Top Butcher Cow was 858 162.00 $90.00 @ 1,635 lbs. 861 161.50 Top Butcher Bull was 864 160.75 $104.00 @ 2,365 lbs. 807 160.00 Bred Cows: $850-$1,700 846 159.75 Pairs: No Test 940 157.50 Fat Hog Top: $58.50@271 lbs. 885 156.60 Sows: No Test 1054 141.50 ergy plus protein at a lower nutrient cost. "If you buy supplement in a tub, you're paying twice what it would cost in a grain ration," he adds. Feeding plans for spring-calving herds look at cows' needs—and the needs of unborn calves. For fall-calving herds, it's too late to improve body condition before breeding season. "We know nutrition for the unborn calf has a lifelong impact on replacement heifers and feedlot steers," Sexten says. "Poor nutrition for pregnant cows reduces lifetime calf performance." For a cow, her first need is body maintenance. "Cloudy days with rain and temperatures near freezing are worse than dry days with temperatures below 20 F," he says. "Cows spend energy to warm their bodies." Feed should be adding body condition (fat) ahead of calving season. The fat layer must be laid on before the cow starts lactat- Cattle sales Tuesday, 11:00 AM. 1 3 2 4 4 10 3 28 4 20 25 8 6 14 1 1 1 For week of December 17, 2013: STEERS 435 467 493 494 506 511 577 584 611 645 666 730 731 769 955 HEIFERS 340 420 213.00 213.00 206.50 204.00 199.50 197.50 189.00 185.00 183.50 180.00 173.50 163.50 163.00 161.50 146.00 199.00 190.00 5 9 5 3 14 4 10 3 2 452 492 508 563 577 610 644 697 930 180.50 176.00 174.50 170.00 169.50 166.00 157.00 145.50 132.00 Top Butcher Cow was $93.50 @ 1,530 lbs. Top Butcher Bull was $104.50 @ 2,365 lbs. Bred Cows: $900-$1,775 • 60 mixed bred ewes, start lambing mid-January, Complete Dispersal • 30 dorper-x Kathadin 2 year old bred ewes PLUS MORE BY SALE TIME! PLUS MORE BY SALE TIME! Visit our new website at jccclivestock.com HOWARD LANGVARDT Tues. & Wed. 8:00 am 785-238-8212 Cell: 785-761-5812 KARL LANGVARDT 785-499-5434 Cell: 785-499-2945 "The Key To Successful Feeding" How do you like your steak? Well done, rare, medium? Everybody has a personal choice. How about your livestock feed? Same deal, everybody's situation is different, and we do cater to what you need and want. We will blend the supplements to complement your feedstuffs ... you name it, we can balance your ration. Call Us Now so we can help you maximize your feedstuffs, livestock productivity and greenbacks in your pocketbook! FOURTH & POMEROY ASSOCIATES, INC. P.O. Box 516, Clay Center, KS 67432 785-632-2141 • WATS 1-800-432-7423 Joseph Ebert, General Manager Bonded & Insured SALE EVERY WEDNESDAY IN EMPORIA, KANSAS AT 11:00 AM 620-342-2425 or 800-835-7803 toll-free • Fax: 620-342-7741 Date: 12/18/13. Total Receipts: 1225. A great run to end our year! The cattle market was good but showed a little weaker due to commodities being lower all week. Cows for slaughter higher. 2 hfrs @285# $189.00 14 strs @601# $176.00 3 hfrs @438# $186.00 3 strs @630# $172.00 3 hfrs @468# $178.00 6 strs @643# $169.50 3 hfrs @512# $172.00 9 strs @661# $169.00 2 hfrs @530# $167.00 8 strs @658# $167.50 3 hfrs @553# $165.75 15 strs @680# $167.50 5 hfrs @599# $152.50 6 strs @688# $167.00 15 hfrs @630# $160.00 5 strs @695# $165.50 13 hfrs @624# $159.00 12 strs @683# $164.00 4 hfrs @628# $157.00 12 strs @692# $163.00 5 hfrs @610# $156.00 9 strs @694# $161.50 2 hfrs @623# $155.00 16 strs @733# $167.00 4 hfrs @659# $151.00 30 strs @719# $165.50 8 hfrs @696# $147.00 11 strs @725# $165.50 21 hfrs @709# $155.75 22 strs @747# $165.50 4 hfrs @715# $154.50 115 strs @730# $164.50 12 hfrs @748# $154.00 9 strs @783# $163.25 7 hfrs @771# $153.00 40 strs @785# $163.00 27 hfrs @798# $151.85 4 strs @754# $162.50 10 hfrs @808# $151.00 44 strs @798# $160.85 6 hfrs @838# $150.25 9 strs @790# $160.50 5 strs @428# $205.00 7 strs @756# $160.00 2 strs @475# $198.00 17 strs @819# $162.25 4 strs @490# $194.00 60 strs @823# $162.00 4 strs @511# $195.00 20 strs @830# $162.00 5 strs @520# $191.00 5 strs @840# $160.00 3 strs @527# $189.00 45 strs @864# $157.00 4 strs @540# $185.00 61 strs @884# $156.50 6 strs @541# $181.00 14 strs @897# $156.50 5 strs @565# $180.00 42 strs @854# $156.10 3 strs @588# $181.00 18 strs @893# $155.10 7 strs @580# $175.00 7 strs @917# $155.00 8 strs @593# $171.50 3 strs @970# $151.50 COWS: $87.00-$96.75 $76.00-$86.75 SHELLS: $75.00 and down Clay Center, Ks • Barn Phone 785-632-5566 Clay Center Field Representatives: Lyle Perry, 785-392-4165 Tom Koch, 785-243-5124 Lance Lagasse, 785-262-1185 MITCH LANGVARDT 785-238-1858 Cell: 785-761-5814 LYNN LANGVARDT 785-762-2702 Cell: 785-761-5813 KCLY-Fm 100.9 BULLS: $92.00-$95.00 PAIRS: 9 yrs old to SS, $1750 EARLY CONSIGNMENTS FOR JANUARY 8TH: • • • • • • • 50 blk & red strs & hfrs, 600-700 lbs. 14 red Angus hfrs, 650-700 lbs. 54 red Angus strs, 750-825 lbs. 350 blk red & char strs, 750-850 lbs. 78 blk & red hfrs, 800-850 lbs. 25 blk & blkwf strs, 825-875 lbs. 20 blk strs, 825-875 lbs. Looking for a Good Dock Run of Cattle with more calves and yearlings! • • • • • • • 310 blk & char strs, 675-750 lbs., Pending 250 blk & blkwf strs & hfrs, 650-850 lbs., fancy, Pending 67 blk & blkwf strs, 800-850 lbs., fancy 170 blk & blkwf hfrs, 800-850 lbs. 65 blk & red hfrs, 800-850 lbs. 120 blk, red & char strs, 775-850 lbs. 30 blk & red strs, 850-900 lbs. CONSIGNMENTS FOR JANUARY 7: 90 Blk X Strs/Hfrs ....................725-800 lbs.............................Weaned 50 Blk X Strs/Hfrs ....................750-825 lbs.............................Weaned Due to postal conflicts we will need your consignments 2 weeks in advance to sale date in order to advertise them in the Grass & Grain. This will be an adjustment but one we feel will help both you as a customer and buyers as well. Thanks for your assistance with this! Seth Lauer 785-949-2285, Abilene FEEDS No Sale Dec. 24th & 31st Due to Holidays! SHEEP & GOAT SALE: JANUARY 4: fully catches up after a slow start. Testing hay pays in just about all ways, Sexten says. But in a bad-hay year, it pays more. Knowing more about pre-calving nutrition for the calf makes hay tests worth more. Without a hay test, a nutritionist can't build a costeffective ration for winter supplement. "Test hay, and then sort it," Sexten says. Feed highest-quality hay to highvalue animals. In a springcalving herd, that's pregnant cows heading to calving time. FEED Pairs: No Test From all of the Langvardt's we would like to wish everyone a Very Merry Christmas! JUNCTION CITY, KANSAS • Barn Phone 785-238-1471 ing. After calving, the cow diverts feed into milk for her calf. She can't gain condition. Winter feeding determines rebreeding next spring. Back fat, shown in body condition, helps cows prepare for breeding. Also, good nutrition before calving adds quality to colostrum, the first milk. A well-fed cow adds fat to colostrum, which jumpstarts her newborn calf. Also, a well-fed cow adds stronger antibodies to pass on to her calf. Antibodies ward off calf illness. A sick calf never EARLY CONSIGNMENTS FOR JANUARY 15TH ANNIVERSARY SALE: NO SALE ON DECEMBER 25TH OR JANUARY 1ST DUE TO THE HOLIDAYS! Come try out the Cowboy Cafe located right here at the Sale Barn! Open Monday-Saturday. Under new management and new menu! CHECK US OUT AT emporialivestock.com FOR ALL THE SCHEDULES AND CONSIGNMENTS! THANK YOU FOR ALL OF YOUR CONTINUED SUPPORT! YOUR BUSINESS ALWAYS APPRECIATED! For Cattle Appraisals Call: BRODY PEAK, 620-343-5107 GLENN UNRUH, 620-341-0607 LYLE WILLIAMS, Field Representative, 785-229-5457 WIBW 580 - 6:45 A.M. Thurs; KVOE 1400 - 6:30-6:45 A.M. Thurs. & Fri. emporialivestock.com

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